Am I Suitable for Laser?

We aim to provide the highest standard of care and every member of the team at Laser Sight Centres Victoria is committed to achieving the best possible outcome for you. During our pre-surgical assessment we apply a strict set of clinical guidelines to look for any factors that could jeopardise a good outcome. For some patients this means they will be advised against surgery. It is this stringent approach that enables us to obtain a high level of success and patient satisfaction.There are many different factors that will be considered to determine whether you are suitable for laser surgery. For more information please visit www.lasik.com.au

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Amount of Refractive Error

​There are limits to how much vision correction LASIK and PRK can provide. The guidelines used by Laser Sight Centres Victoria are not more than 10 dioptres of myopia, not more than 4 dioptres of hyperopia and not more than 6 dioptres of astigmatism.

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Prescription Stability

​It is important to establish that your prescription is not significantly changing. We like to see very little change for at least 12 months prior to surgery and preferably longer. For younger shortsighted people, their prescription may not stabilise until their mid to late 20s. Operating on eyes that are still in the process of changing can result in disappointment when glasses become necessary again after a few years.

Corneal Anomalies

Corneal Anomalies

Thin Corneas – People with corneas that are thinner than average are advised against LASIK surgery because of the risk of a very rare complication called corneal ectasia. Irregular corneas – If a cornea is irregular in shape then it may not suitable for LASIK surgery. We use sophisticated corneal topographers to assess the corneal shape. Any tendency to corneal warpage or keratoconus usually means that LASIK may not be the best option.

Sometimes surface laser treatment (PRK) may be offered though.

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Other Eye Conditions

Some anterior eye conditions such as dry-eye or blepharitis (inflammation of the eye lids) are relatively minor issues that need to be treated and cleared up before having laser surgery. Other conditions such as corneal dystrophies or severe ocular surface diseases mean that laser surgery is not advisable. We carefully assess your eyes to look for any potential problems. Conditions such as glaucoma, ocular hypertension, diabetic retinopathy and retinal tears or detachment are looked for during the assessment. These conditions (as well as others) can increase the risk of complications and will be carefully assessed.

General Health

General Health

Various medical conditions affect the body’s capacity to heal and could affect the recovery of the eye following surgery. Conditions such as poorly controlled diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune or collagen vascular diseases can cause unpredictable results after surgery.

Certain medications can also affect the accuracy of the preoperative tests and the recovery of the eye after surgery so be sure to advise your eye care practitioner of any medications you are taking.

Pregnancy – Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding are not ideal candidates for laser surgery as their hormone levels are fluctuating which can cause changes in the ocular surface and prescription. It is best to wait for 3 months after stopping breastfeeding before considering laser surgery.

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Motivation

Like all surgery, there are no guarantees of a perfect outcome on every occasion. While certain visual factors might make you a good candidate for laser eyesight correction, we also have to consider your personality and your activities of daily living to determine whether you are likely to be happy with the outcomes of laser eyesight correction.